About your Search

20120801
20120831
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
, there is a bit of a peanut tradition. please explain. >> well, at jpl, you know, with a nearly 50-year record of unbelievable planetary exploration, about 40 years ago the tradition began of opening peanuts when a keen event in planetary exploration began. we passed the peanuts around for good luck right before opportunity landed. and of course some of the pebbles under the rover deck remind us of those peanuts so it's all a good thing. >> and also, mohawk guy. cnn talked to him just yesterday. let's roll the sound. >> the thought that in some way of kids and other people that are motivated to come work here because they see me and they say, that guy can put stuff on mars, maybe i can too, i would like to say it takes all types to make these missions work. >> have you been just overwhelmed by the excitement? and i'm not just talking about his mohawk, but the whole deep space exploration, really just this outpouring in the last couple of days i'm sure globally. what does that mean for you and nasa? >> well, it means so much for all of us, because this is an 11-year journey. the engineers at jp
by laboratory -- i'm sorry. the jpl research scientist working with nasa, dr. luther beagle this morning. good to you have with us. >> good to be here. >> bill: curiosity as now we understand, on its way moving ever so slowly toward this mountainside is it or so of 400 meters away? >> yeah. we're moving to a place called triple plain. it's got a name -- i'm going to pronounce it wrong. but it is called galag. we've called it that because we have a naming convention. we've named this pretty interesting. we'll explore and see what's there. >> bill: how long will it take you to get there? 400 meeters is not a long distance. >> it is about a quarter of a mile. we're driving right now around 30 to 40 meters per day. it will take about ten days to get there if we go in a straight line. if we see something interesting along the way we'll stop and check it out. >> bill: what have we learned so far from curiosity? >> well, we've just come out of the checkout phase. we use the first two and a half, three weeks to make sure
laboratory or jpl. you are steely-eyed missile men and you deserve every missed high five of your celebration. i got to say, it was nice to see that nasa saved money by hiring staff from the local best buy. but, folks -- it's a penny pincher, a penny pincher. and, folks, just cry to conceive of what was achieved this morning. we gently landed a one ton, six-wheel suv 154 million miles from earth. i mean, that onstar lady is getting good. we now have two rovers on the surface of mars and three satellites orbiting it. basically if the planets are a tray of donuts, we have now licked mars. it's ours. we already had the moon, we just need venus for the monopoly and we can start building hotels on them. >> welcome back to "morning joe." sam stein and katty kay are still with us, along with john meacham in new york. joining us here in washington, the host of "hardball" chris matthews. and author of "jack kennedy." >> chris, you came on set and said you like what harry reid did. >> how could you like that? >> i liked it because i think obama has needed confederates in the field for most of his life
billion or more a piece have largely paid back the money. can you name some of the major banks? guest: jpl morgan, citibank -- j.p. morgan, citibank, goldman sachs paid back tarp. initially, $125 billion was given to the largest banks and it quickly paid back. host: and banks worth less than $10 billion a piece, and moneys outstanding versus what they paid back. what is it about the smaller banks giving them a harder time? guest: a lot of the smaller banks are not as healthy as the big banks. they also don't have easy access to the capital market, so it is harder for them to go out and raise capital to pay it back. host: here is a piece that you wrote for bloomberg a couple of weeks ago. the u.s. treasury department said it started selling stakes today -- first of all, why get out of it? why is of the treasury department trying to extricate itself from these banks? guest: hutras reece says it was never intended to be a lifelong shareholder of banks, so it was natural they would eventually get out. i think they are realistic probably will not do with this year. and probably will continue in
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)